A study on the impact of womens' migration on entrepreneurship was presented at research seminar by Marshall Business School at GSOM SPbU

Guest seminar "Predicting Social Entrepreneurship Activity: the Mediating Role of Female Migration" led by Jill Kickul and Mark Griffiths (Marshall Business School, University of Southern California) was held at the Graduate School of Management on June 23, 2017 at GSOM SPbU (co-authored with Jacqueline V. Orr and Lisa Gundry).

 

The seminar was organized by the PricewaterhouseCoopers Center for Corporate Social Responsibility of GSOM SPbU (Professor Yu. Blagov, Senior Lecturer Y. Aray, Department of Strategic and International Management, SPbU). The study presented by Jill Kickul and Mark Griffiths investigates several macro-level factors that can stimulate or impede the emergence of social entrepreneurship. Researchers employs enhanced variables to capture local perceptions, secondary data inputs as well as OLS regression techniques were used to understand their effects on social entrepreneurial activity.

 

Jill Kickul (the author of the book “Understanding Social Entrepreneurship: The Relentless Pursuit of Mission in an Ever Changing World”, available at GSOM SPbU Library) stressed that women are more likely to engage in social entrepreneurship than commercial entrepreneurship. According to presented research the influences of trust, legitimacy and sound governance on improving performance and growth of social entrepreneurial enterprises, and the need for international governance mechanisms to promote economic and social efficiency and equity. The results reveal that a country’s governance and female migration are related to the level of social entrepreneurial activity. Positive female migration serves as an important mediating role between governance and increased levels of social entrepreneurial activity. Macro determinants of social entrepreneurship supply human capital.

 

As important detail J. Kickul and M. Griffiths marked that large pool of data for their research were get from the 2016 Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) special issue on social entrepreneurship. It is identified the countries of interest and the availability of data (GEM 2016 was presented at GSOM SPbU previous day, June 22, 2017). The investigators found in GEM key information on social entrepreneurial activity, governance and net female migration, control variables (the percentage of the population living below the poverty line, the labor participation, the size of the gender gap). But the GEM dataset is limited by treatment and under-representation of disputed parts of the world. When combined with the Legatum Institute’s dataset, there may be data lags and differential effects and weights of sub-indices in various parts of the world. It would be interesting to develop an improved measure of social entrepreneurship activity. An assessment should be performed with regard to a country’s ecosystem for social enterprise development, including a more in-depth examination of the intellectual, social and financial resources available to nascent and growing social ventures. 

 

In general guest presentation was based on analysis limited to 55 countries for which we have data related to social entrepreneurship activity and on the proportion of working-age individuals who are either in the process of starting a social entrepreneurial business or are owner-managers of such businesses.

 

J. Kickul and M. Griffiths posit that countries with higher female immigration rates will see more “supply” for social entrepreneurs and therefore more social entrepreneurship activity. Governance is fully mediated by female migration. Relationship between governance and social entrepreneurship activity was no longer significant after accounting for female migration. Female migration is a crucial link between governance and social entrepreneurship activity. They examine macro factors that might stimulate the emergence of social entrepreneurship.

 

Governance assesses the level of internal security and prosperity of a country, stability in overall safety and security suggests a country may maintain the intellectual and social capital essential to stimulating a social entrepreneurship.

 

Increased female migration was linked to increased social entrepreneurship activity. Gender is more predictive of social entrepreneurship than anticipated. Generally, migration is “significantly predictive of entrepreneurship even when controlling for key aspects of the country context”.

 

This investigation gives way to the following logical considerations for leaders who wish to increase social entrepreneurship activity within their countries:

- creating conditions of gender equity (especially for recent immigrants)

- implications for social versus traditional entrepreneurship;

- improving governance practices, especially with regard to immigrants;

- increasing access to financial capital and other types of support for (social) entrepreneurs, and particularly for those from marginalized backgrounds.

 

Closing the presentation guest speakers highlighted that immigration is “significantly predictive of entrepreneurship even when controlling for key aspects of the country context”. Gross migration flows, or migration churn, has a higher correlation with new business activity than other commonly-used regional demographic or economic development measures.

The seminar was visited by GSOM Faculty, doctoral students, external business practitioners and CSR researchers. A vivid discussion and positive dialogue ended the meeting of guests and audience.

 

  

Information about speakers and authors:

 

Jill Kickul, Ph.D.

Professor, Lloyd Greif Center for Entrepreneurial Studies

Research Director, USC Brittingham Social Enterprise Lab

Marshall School of Business

University of Southern California

The author of the book “Understanding Social Entrepreneurship: The Relentless Pursuit of Mission in an Ever Changing World” (Routledge; 2012). Available at GSOM SPbU Library.

 

Mark D Griffiths, PhD.

Senior Lecturer

Department of Finance and Business Economics

Marshall School of Business

University of Southern California

 

Jacqueline V. Orr

M.S. Social Entrepreneurship Candidate (2018),
University of Southern California

Research & Teaching Associate, USC Brittingham Social Enterprise Lab

Graduate Fellow, USC Greif Center for Entrepreneurial Studies

 

 

 

 

 

 

Фотогалерея

В ВШМ СПбГУ прошла презентация исследования влияния женской миграции на предпринимательство ученых из Школы бизнеса Маршалла