Course portfolio 2015-2016

 

 

 Courses, taught in Russian language

 

Introduction to Statistics and Probabilities Theory (facultative discipline)

 

 

Instructor: Associate Professor I. Berezinets

 

This course is an introduction course, aiming to develop skills of thinking in terms of probabilities theory, required for quantitative analysis and building models in management, as well as in prerequisite for Econometrics I and II courses.

 

Core literature

The Cambridge Dictionary of Statistics, Fourth Edition,  by  B. S. Everitt and A. Skrondal, Cambridge University Press, 2010

 

Course length: 15 hours of classes

 

 

History of Organizational and Managerial Thought (facultative discipline)

 

 

Instructor: Associate Professor T. Klemina

 

The course aims to provide students with knowledge on history and modern state of the art in organizational theory as research area and theoretical basis for development of managerial thought. During the course we put emphasis on historic conditions of emergence and theoretical roots of schools of thought, their main assumptions and their contribution for development of organizational thought, as well as theory and practice of management.

 

Core literature

No compulsory textbook. Literature is assigned for the doctoral students’ individual projects.

 

Course length: 30 hours of classes

 

 

Econometrics I (facultative discipline)

 

Instructor: Associate Professor I. Berezinets

 

The main topics of Econometrics I course include time series, imitation modeling, linear and non-linerar econometric models, regression models on the base of the panel data, econometric models for the nominal and ordinal variables. The main task of the course is to prepare students to effectively attend Econometrics II course.

 

Core literature

Носко В.П. Эконометрика. – М., Дело. В 2 т., 2011

 

Course length: 45 hours of classes

 

 

 Courses, taught in English language

 

English for Researchers

 

Instructor: Associate Professor E. Orlova

 

The aim of the course is to help students to achieve target level of foreign language competence C1 (based on qualification scale of European Council). The foreign language competency should also be adapted for solving communicative tasks of the doctoral level in research and scientific area of communication in relation to business and management.

Objectives of the course and targeted outcomes include:

  • Achieving language knowledge in the field of scientific discourse, specific terminology at the level of C1;
  • Developing skills and competences in presenting research papers, conducting research discussion, processing and transforming research and scientific information, reading scientific literature, and writing research papers in accordance with C1 level.

 

Core literature

There is no compulsory textbook. Reading assignments are provided during the course and are adjusted to the topics of doctoral research.

 

Course length: 100 hours of classes

 

 

Philosophy of Science

 

Instructor: Professor E. Karavaev

 

The aim of the course is to provide students with the knowledge on the main questions of modern philosophy of science (including philosophic questions of management theory as special field of socio-humanitarian area).

Objectives and targeted outcomes include:

  • Introduce main paradigms in philosophy of science, study main problems in philosophy of science, and in particular consider key philosophic questions in management theory$
  • Obtain skills of analysis of philosophic questions of modern scientific cognition, in particular related to theory and practice of management.

 

Course length: 100 hours of classes

 

 

 

Econometrics II

 

Instructor: Associate Professor Nikolay Zubanov

 

This course offers a more in-depth treatment of some of the topics in Econometrics I, such as linear regression, panel data and stochastic simulation, as well as introduces students to the new topics of instrumental variables regression, dynamic panel data, truncated and censored regression, and experimental econometrics. Theories and methods related to the above topics will be illustrated with their empirical applications. A successful completion of the course will help students understand the methods used in modern empirical literature in economics and management, as well as their limitations. The course will also complement Econometrics I in equipping students with the toolkit necessary to carry out their own empirical research at an appropriate technical level.

Communications with the course instructor about own research topics during the course and beyond are encouraged. Time will be made available for presentations of individual research projects at the end of the course, if there is a demand for this. Stata software will be used for illustration of how the estimation techniques learned during the course can be implemented in practice.

 

Core literature

 

  • M. Semadeni, M. Withers, S. Certo (2013) The perils of endogeneity and instrumental variables in strategy research: Understanding through simulations. Strategic Management Journal, 35: 1070-1079.
  • P. Davidson, S. Gordon (2012) Panel studies of new venture creation: a methods-focussed review and suggestions for future research. Small Business Economics, 39:853-876.
  • H. Margetts (2011) Experiments for public management research. Public Management Review, 13: 189-208.
  • J. List (2011) Why economists should conduct field experiments and 14 tips for pulling one off. Journal of Economic Perspectives, 25: 3-16.

 

Course length: 30 hours of classes

 

 

Microeconomic Analysis

 

Instructor: Associate Professor Y. Fedotov

 

This course continues the study of microeconomic theory and its applications to some selected problems of both practical and academic interest. It examines the manner in which economic agents, i.e., producers, consumers, and resource owners, acting through the market make individual decisions, determine the prices and output of goods; the consistency of individual decisions of economic agents; the allocation of productive resources, and the functional distribution of incomes. The price system is seen as a network of interrelated decisions, with the market process serving to communicate information to decision makers.

Microeconomic analysis involves problem-solving, which assumes specification of an issue under consideration, construction of an adequate model and solution of respective problem.

The aim of the course is to provide students with deeper understanding of economic agents’ behavior in the markets and improve their analytical skills by developing basic tools of microeconomic analysis through addressing economic problems with advanced economic models and quantitative methods.

The course objectives are:

  1. To demonstrate how microeconomics can be used to explain and predict household and firm behavior.
  2. To show how households respond optimally to changes in prices and income and how prices and quantities are determined under different types of market structure.
  3. To demonstrate the effect of government policy on household and firm decision making.
  4. To develop problem-solving skills, so reinforcing understanding of microeconomic concepts.

 

Core literature

  • Mas-Colell A., Whinston M.D., Green J.R. Microeconomic Theory – New York: Oxford University Press, 1995. –  XVII+681 p.
  • Varian, Hal R. Microeconomic Analysis, Third Edition. New York, NY: W.W. Norton, 1992. – XVI+506+A42

 

Course length: 30 hours of classes

 

 

Theory of Industrial Organization

 

Instructor: Associate Professor N. Zenkevich

 

The course looks at those features of market behavior that are related to strategic behavior at the advanced-undergraduate level. It analyzes the choice of price, capacity, product positioning, research and development, and other strategic variables in oligopoly. The course covers shot-run competition, including the effect of capacity constrains and repeated price competition, price differentiation, barriers to entry, location, competition in research and development and the adoption of new technologies. It makes heavy use of some notations of game theory.

 

Core literature

N. Zenkevich “Game-theoretic models of strategic interaction”, 2012.

 

Course length: 30 hours of classes

   

Methods of Qualitative Research

 

Instructor: Professor G. Shirokova

 

Qualitative methods, particularly case studies are a popular research strategy used in business and management disciplines. Yet the researcher is faced with a complex set of choices when planning and undertaking a case study. In this advanced course, Doctoral students will be introduced to current debates on case study methodology, key considerations for case researchers during the research process and contrasting perspectives on how the quality of case research should be evaluated. Doctoral students will also be given the opportunity to reflect on and enhance their own research practice.

The purpose of this course is to introduce doctoral students to the diversity of ways of conducting case study research and to improve their own research practice. As an advanced course on qualitative research, it is assumed that students have already completed an introduction to research methods.

The course has a strong focus on the process of conducting case studies which necessitates interaction with fellow students and instructor over course duration. After this course, the doctoral student will be able to evaluate case research with increased confidence and enhance his/her own case study design.

 

Core literature

Yin R.K. 2009. Case Study Research: Design and Methods. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, Inc.

 

Course length: 15 hours of classes

   

Methods of Research in Economics and Management (Introductory Course)

 

Instructor: Associate Professor M. Smirnova

 

The objective of the course is to assist doctoral students’ mastery of research methods in the social sciences as applied to the research topic, as well as to introduce students to modeling in social sciences on example of structural equation modeling.

 

Core literature

Compulsory readings include papers in the top academic journals. The readings will be distributed to students in relation to each class.

 

Course length: 30 hours of classes

 

 

Methods of Research in Economics and Management II

 

Instructors: Associate Professor Y. Fedotov, Associate Professor N. Zenkevich

 

The course is designed as a combination of two relatively independent modules, each devoted to advances in different methodologies of quantitative analysis applied in economics and management studies. Every module includes 15 academic hours of classes and pursues the goal to provide students with basic understanding and knowledge of theoretical foundations of a particular methodological approach (Game-theoretic approach in decision-making research and Methods of Frontier Analysis), opportunities and limitations for its practical applications in empirical research, developing skills in modeling, computations and interpretation of results through solving the exercises based on empirical data.

 

Core literature

  • Working paper # 13 (R)–2012. V. Yu. Archavski, V.L. Okulov. An Experiment on Decision Making under Risk and Uncertainty. Working Paper # 13 (R)–2012. Graduate School of Management, St. Petersburg State University: SPb, 2012.
  • Barmettler, F., Fehr, E., Zehnder, C. (2012) Big experimenter is watching you! Anonymity and prosocial behavior in the laboratory. Games and Economic Behavior 75, 17-34.
  • Berninghaus, S.K., Ehrhard, K-M, Ott, M. (2012) Forward-looking behavior in Hawk-Dove games in endogenous networks: Experimental evidence. Games and Economic Behavior 75, 35-52.
  • Dubois, D., Willinger, M., Van Nguyen, P. (2012) Optimization incentive and relative riskiness (2012) International Journal of Game Theory, 41, 369-380.
  • Bogetoft P. (2012) Performance Benchmarking: Measuring and Managing Performance: ch.1-3.
  • Bogetoft P., Otto L. (2011)  Benchmarking with DEA, SFA, and R. (International series in operations research & management science, v.157): ch.1-3.

 

Course length: 30 hours of classes

 

 

Strategic Management (elective discipline)

 

Instructor: Professor Asta Salmi

 

The main objectives of the course are to provide an in-depth understanding of the strategic management research at the PhD level and knowledge of the milestone articles in the field. The course should enable students to understand of classic and on-going streams within the domain of strategic management, as well as to relate their own studies to the field.

This PhD course in Strategic Management focuses on the main theories and some of the core research streams of strategy research. It provides an overview of the development of strategic management research over time through a number of theoretical perspectives and empirical domains. Special focus is given on network strategies. After the course the participants will know a number of specific theories and be familiar with the trends in strategic management research.

 

Core literature

There is no text for this course. The readings will be distributed to students in relation to each class.

 

Course length: 15 hours of classes

 

 

Marketing (elective discipline)

 

Instructor: Assistant Professor D. Dalman

 

This seminar will review major contributions and recent developments in the marketing discipline. We will examine prevailing theories of strategy, branding, innovation, and competition, as well as emerging ones, to discuss their foundations and implications. We will discuss research paradigms and approaches currently being used in the field. A principal purpose of this course is to introduce students to concepts and state-of-art research and to develop an understanding of different research paradigms in use on the field. This course is designed for candidates who are expected to conduct original marketing strategy research that can be published in the leading marketing and strategy journals. 

 

Core literature

Top 4 marketing journals (Journal of Marketing, Journal of Marketing Research, Marketing Science, Journal of Consumer Research) as well as other FT-45 business publications.

 

Course length: 15 hours of classes

 

 

Supply Chain Management (elective discipline)

 

Instructor: Associate Professor A. Schulte

 

The objective of this course is to provide a theory driven understanding of supply chain management. This course will provide the student with an understanding of supply chain concepts, frameworks, and theory. Designed to be broad in scope, the course covers fundamental topics including strategy, postponement, integration, inventory management, relational exchange, innovation, quality, behavioral approaches, and outsourcing. Students will be exposed to a range of theoretical frameworks including the resource-based view, transaction costs analysis, and innovation theory, among others. Through directed readings, students will also be exposed to a variety of methods including survey design and analysis, design and use of experiments, analysis of secondary data, case analysis, and, to a limited extent, qualitative analysis.

 

Core literature

There is no text for the course. Course readings are listed in the Plan of Classes.

 

Course length: 15 hours of classes

 

 

Advanced Research in Management (elective discipline)

 

Paper development workshop

 

Core literature

There is no text for this course. The readings will be self-selected by students in relation to each research topic.

 

Course length: 5 hours of classes

 

 

Advanced Research in Marketing (elective discipline)

 

Paper development workshop

 

Core literature

There is no text for this course. The readings will be self-selected by students in relation to each research

 

Course length: 5 hours of classes

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