Global Supply Chain Management

Instructor:

Prof. Dr. Tina Wakolbinger

Prof. Dr. Sebastian Kummer

WU Wien, Institute for Transport and Logistics Management

Yuri V. Fedotov, PhD, Associate Professor

Konstantin V. Krotov, PhD, Senior Lecture

 

Graduate School of Management, St. Petersburg University

 

Workload:

 

6,0 ECTS

200 student work hours

 

Prerequisites:

Beginners (no prerequisites required, but intensive learning program)

 

Goals and objectives:

 

Provide students with the required profound knowledge regarding logistical activities and quantitative tools in order to be able to examine, understand and solve challenges of modern supply chain management in a global environment. In cooperation with a corporate partner, students will apply the course content with the aim of examining and improving a real supply chain configuration.

 

Course Content:

 

Students will do an entry-exam before the program. Students will be asked to prepare a short research proposal based on the assigned research topics prior to the departure to St Petersburg.

 

At the end of the course students should be able to:

 

  • understand the challenges of Global Supply Chain Management
  • know the core components of contemporary supply chain management and how they are put in practice
  • know basic concepts of logistics and transport management and how to apply them in the context of a Global Supply Chain
  • understand logistics and marketing interface in context of Global Supply Chains
  • understand and apply decision analysis models, linear and discrete optimization in Global Supply Chain decision making
  • know the supply chain performance metrics and understand approaches to supply chain performance measurement
  • examine real-case supply chains and propose improvements
  • learn state of being of logistics infrastructure in Russia
  • understand specifics of logistics and supply chain management in Russian companies 

 

Teaching Methods:

 

Lecture, reading assignments, group discussions, group work, group presentations, case studies

 

Course Reading:

 

Literature for the entry-exam:

Simchi-Levi D., Kaminsky P., Simchi-Levi, E. (2007): Designing and Managing the Supply Chain. 3rd edition, McGraw-Hill Irwin, Boston: Chapter 1 (Introductionto Supply Cahi n Management), p. 1-18; Chapter 3 (Network Planning), p. 77-109; Chapter 10 (Global Logistics and Risk Management) 309-329, Chapter 11 (Coordinated Product and Supply Chain Design), 331-357

Shapiro, J.: Modeling the Supply Chain, international student edition, 2nd Ed., Duxburg, Pacific Grove, CA 2007: Chapter 1(Supply Chain Management, Integrated Planning, and Models), p. 3-27

 

Course literature:

Simchi-Levi D., Kaminsky P., Simchi-Levi, E. (2007): Designing and Managing the Supply Chain. 3rd Ed., McGraw-Hill Irwin, Boston: Chapter 5 (The Value of Information), p. 143-177; Chapter 7 (Distribution Strategies), p. 209-241; Chapter 9 (Procurement and Outsourcing Strategies), p. 267-308

Shapiro, J.: Modeling the Supply Chain, international student edition, 2nd Ed., Duxburg, Pacific Grove, CA 2007: Chapter 3 (Fundamentals of Optimization Models: Linear Programming), p. 61-107; Chapter 4 (Fundamentals of Optimization Models: Mixed Integer Programming), p. 117-159;
Chapter 11 ( Supply Chain Decision Making Under Uncertainty), p. 443-473

 

Grading Policy: 

 

Written exam in Vienna - 20%

Research Proposal (handed in before departure) - 10%

Progress exams in St. Petersburg (in total for both exams) - 20%

Seminar paper - 40%

Presentation of paper - 10%

 

Videos
Alumni reviews
Top